Bracing for the 2024 Election Cycle

September 29, 2023

Politics: should employers comment? Get the inside scoop from Candor President Ally Glavas.

Election season chaos is imminent, and business leaders are likely wondering — will commenting on any issue in the news cycle come across as choosing sides? Candor chatted with our resident public affairs expert, President Ally Glavas, to help leaders navigate this slippery slope. 

 

Q: Should employers communicate about political issues and elections? 

Ally: This is a hotly debated topic, and the answer is often determined by age. Historically, it was considered best to avoid any political discussions or positions to not alienate employees or risk a public relations crisis. But a 2021 survey by Atlassian says 61% of millennials prefer a company that takes a stance on social issues. Support grows to 87% across all generations when social stances relate to issues relevant to their business. 

The tide is turning, so dip your toe into the water by focusing on topics that impact the bottom line. Educate employees about potential benefits or downsides of proposed policies and encourage them to engage in the political process.  

 

Q: How can leaders encourage political advocacy? 

Ally: Here are 3 ideas to increase political engagement: 

  1. Send email reminders about voter registration deadlines, election dates and links for employees to find their polling place. 

  1. Host a lunch & learn with employees and invite elected officials from different political parties to speak. 

  1. Share your industry association’s materials with employees — political endorsements, fact sheets, etc.  

 

Q: What other implications might business leaders consider ahead of the 2024 election? 

Ally: Advertising is more expensive to secure during election season. It’s also challenging to break through the noise, so we advise watching your marketing mix closely during political season.

Picture of Ally Glavas

Ally Glavas

Ally is a self-proclaimed political junkie who got her start in public affairs working in the nation’s capital. She is accustomed to crafting grassroots strategies that influence state and federal legislative and regulatory decisions.

Our Most Recent Posts